Thursday , 9 July 2020
Why Celebs Are Important For Your Creative Business

Why Celebs Are Important For Your Creative Business

Taylor Swift, the Little Pinked Bag and the $130,000 Pajamas

I remember the day like it was yesterday.

It was the Nordstrom buyer on the other end of the line. And what he said nearly made my jaw hit the floor.

“Yes, Ms. Shaw… we want your handbags.”

In instant, I had gone from a struggling handbag designer to being the latest trendsetter in one of the most prestigious stores in the country.

But how did it all happen?

One word…

Celebrities.

I got my products into the hands of some of the famous women on the planet. And when that happened, I gain instant credibility, immediate recognition and, most importantly, I had store buyers, the media and online customers banging on my door just to get a taste of what I had to offer.

pumpstrend2013

How Celebrities Can Transform Your Business… Overnight

It’s no secret: people go absolutely gaga for celebrities. Whether it’s the real (Lady) Gaga or any one of the hundreds of actresses, pop stars, entertainers or reality queens, celebrities have a massive influence on what consumers wear, carry and buy.

I call it the “Celebrity Effect”…

When the public sees a celebrity wearing or carrying YOUR product, they’ll immediately think you’re a celebrity, too. And that means one thing…

Cha-ching! Increased sales, instant media credibility and store buyers who practically beg you to take their calls.

And the best part is – you DON’T have to be famous to get your products to a celebrity!

 

How an Ordinary Mom Has Landed Over 70 Celebrities

Before you think I’m some glitzy Hollywood socialite, I should tell you that I’m a single mom with twin 7 year-old girls. (who sometimes drive me a little crazy!) I live on a quiet street in an even quieter Colorado town.

And if you saw me on any given day, I might have my hair in pigtails, with no makeup and an old pair of jeans…. hardly a glamorous life!

Yet I’ve managed to get products to over 70 A-List celebrities – women like Angelina Jolie, Sandra Bullock, Jennifer Garner, Jennifer Aniston and Oprah… And I also turned my signature handbag into the “it” fashion item in L.A.

And here’s what it did for me…

The “Pinked Bag” that Landed Nordstrom

If you’ve ever tried to get your products into stores – whether they’re small boutiques or bigger chains – you probably know it can be pretty tough.

Buyers are hard to get a hold of and even harder to sell.

That is, unless you get your products to a celebrity. Because then the tables are turned.

Think about it this way: buyers have an obligation to stock their shelves with products they think their customers will buy. And buyers are no dummies – they know their customers will go bananas over anything a celebrity has.

Way back in 2001, I got my pinked handbag  into the Reese Witherspoon hit, Legally Blonde. This landed me an immediate sale to Nordstrom – an account I had been trying (and failing) to get for years.

But a simple publicity photo from the movie landed me a $120,000 sale and took my company into 7 figures in sales.

LegallyBlonde

Taylor Swift and the Media Frenzy

Think buyers go crazy for celebs? Well they’re nothing compared to the media.

The press is constantly on the looking for their next “bread slicer”… and believe me, nothing slices the bread like stories about celebrities with the newest product.

Open any fashion or lifestyle magazine, and you’ll see page after page of style news, fashion news, stories and ads. And in all of them, the celebrity is wearing or carrying a different product.

And there’s a reason for that: magazine editors know that their readers have an insatiable appetite for which celebrity is carrying or wearing the next new thing.

And it can be anything – craft jewelry, a handmade tote, a designer dress, even a t-shirt.

Anytime a celebrity shows up with something no one’s seen before, it’s news. And it doesn’t matter what it is. I’ve had clients with all of these types of products land some of the most famous celebs you can imagine… Taylor Swift, Ellen DeGeneres, Cameron Diaz.

And I’ve personally been in just about every major fashion magazine there is – Lucky, ELLE, InStyle, Oprah, US Weekly, People, WWD and more!

 

How a Pair of PJ’s Made Me $130,000

Of course, no one is more influenced by celebrities than the average shopper.

After all, who do you think is reading all those magazines and flocking to all those stores to buy all those celebrity products?

Once a customer finds out a celebrity has your product…. forget about it! They will run to your website to snap it up!

When I owned my second company, Style Council, I got my designer pajamas to Jennifer Aniston… and she showed up wearing them in People magazine.

The result? Lightning in a bottle – $130,000 in sales on my website in just 6 weeks!

Up until that time, we’d been averaging just over $3,000 a week, but that one media placement increased my sales 720%!

How You Can Get Your Products to Celebrities, Too…

The great news for you is that you don’t have to be a Hollywood socialite or live in the “90210” to get your products to celebrities.

As I mentioned, I’m just an ordinary mom with an ordinary life, and I’ve done it over 70 times for both myself and dozens of my clients. All you need is the blueprint…

Want to see how you can do it, too? Then we’ve got the blueprint to show you how…

It’s called the Celebrity Access Blueprint.

It’s the proven letter we’ve used to land over 70 celebrities. And with it, you’ll discover the “secret ingredients” to contacting and landing a celebrity.

It’s yours for FREE… download it here 

Celeb-Blueprint

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One comment

  1. Great article! I’ve always wondered how an artist can get “discovered”. Thank you for sharing.

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